We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
8

The question is too specific, it isn't phrased in a way that lends itself to answers that would help anyone except you. It might have done better if it was recast to more of a general situation that many writers might clearly face. Generally when you need to include lengthy background about your own story in order for people to understand your question, it'...


8

The edit didn't improve the question in any way that'd allow for re-opening. Questions asking what to write are firmly off-topic here. The links at the bottom of the closure notice will explain this in more detail. This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason: "This question appears to be off-topic ...


8

I don't see this as a "what to write" question. The author has a very clear sense of their goal -- they want their protagonist to gradually accept something unthinkable, as also being a harsh necessity. What they're having trouble with is the execution -- which makes sense to me; "How do I persuade the reader of something unthinkable" feels to me like a ...


7

Beta sites don't usually get custom migration targets. (We got EL&U as an exception to the usual rules, years ago.) The last time we looked there weren't enough questions flowing from Writing to Worldbuilding to make the case for another target, but I haven't reviewed the current data. In the absence of a custom close reason, you can always bring up ...


7

Yes, questions about existing literature are off-topic on Writing.SE Taken from the Help Center, specifically the topic What topics can I ask about here?: On the other hand, these kinds of questions aren't allowed here: [...] - Questions seeking to interpret or analyze an existing work (except when applied to a real-world writing project). Fos ...


5

On its own, it's a question for English. But the longer question does connect to a fictional setting and it's reasonable to ask in a writing context. If someone new to SE were coming in with that question asking where to post it, I'd probably direct them to English. But given the story context, it's not unreasonable to have it on Writing. I have a ...


5

I think that question is sufficiently well-defined to be answerable. You aren't just asking for opinions. Sure, people will probably answer that to some degree based on opinions, but it's opinion that can be backed up by fact, references, or expertise. In such a case, it's not a problem. Note the clarification for when to apply the "primarily opinion-based"...


4

It fits better on EL&U Disclaimer: I am not active on EL&U and not 100% certain on their guidelines. If I saw this question on Writing.SE I would vote to close as off-topic. One of our off topic guidelines is: The strictly interpreted correctness of English grammar or syntax rules (please ask those on English Language & Usage, instead). I ...


4

While I agree that the question could have been phrased better, and that the way it is written now, it walks the line, with such borderline cases I prefer to err on the side of allowing the question to stand. Several reasons for this: The question can attract good answers (and this one indeed has, as @Standback points out). I would not deprive the community ...


4

There is a sort of consensus on Stack Exchange that list questions are bad. Here and here are two prominent discussions of the subjects on Meta.SE. Drawing on those discussions, the two main problems with list questions are: Those questions cannot, by their very definition, have one "correct" answer. All answers would be adding sources, all are equally good....


3

You can cast reopen votes once you get the "close and reopen questions privilege"; on this site, that means reaching a reputation of 500 (other sites will have different bars). The author can edit their question to bring it on topic, if they want to. Discussion in the comments can often help them figure out how to edit the question into something that will ...


3

I think some of those questions can be valid, to an extent. The three act structure is derived from existing stories, and identifying where beats occur in "Lord of the Rings" vs the movie "The Equalizer" can be helpful to a writer, to help them see the underlying structure common to stories that appear on the surface to be very different. For example ...


2

This question should be on English Language & Usage and not on Writing. It's not about writing. It's information that might be useful to a writer, but then is information from a wide variety of places. The question about the word "temping" is different. This is a question from a writer asking if a term will have the same meaning across English ...


2

In my opinion, this question definitely walks the line between "what should I write" and "how do I achieve such-and-such a result". I'd vote to close if I were a user, but as a moderator I can't do that, I can only close it unilaterally - and I don't think the question is as blatantly what-to-write to warrant moderator intervention. Please feel free to ...


2

"How to write" would be "Here is this email I have written. I think it is rude. Can you help me make it more polite?" That's working with existing copy. "What to write" is "I want to accomplish X," whether X is a plot, an email, or a homework assignment. That's off-topic. We aren't going to choose the phrasing for you.


2

Sorry to bump an old thread but seems it came up again over a current question. This is a hard one to answer, I can see the arguments for both sides of the coin and one we should probably revisit. While I do agree we want to keep critiquing out, helping someone find research or providing insight to how a certain expertise is done should be allowed. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible