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Like Wikipedia, is there a way here at stack exchange to sign an edit as 'minor' (like in grammar, spelling corrections) and avoid bumping the question to the top of the list?


Suggestion:

  1. Having the feature only for the individual question owners. That way, if they find a minor mistake a bit late, they could correct it and if someone else finds a 'significant' mistake, they could tell them to correct it.
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This is a good idea, but, as Standback's and balpha's links have pointed out, Stack Exchange has clearly said no to this, because they feel it would make the site less transparent:

Implementing any sort of "don't bump" functionality would also delay accountability and transparency for those edits.

Notifying users of edits in the system allows them to take a look at the content and make sure there isn't something fishy going on. Imagine if people could make changes to the system without anybody noticing. That is very exploitable.

I understand their concerns, but don't entirely agree with SE's position. (I haven't pursued it because but the issue isn't that important to me.)

Can you think of a way to propose this that would counter SE's objections about transparency and accountability?

  • And by the way, it's most important to me about me. That is, when I'm correcting my own questions... Hey! Maybe that's it: How about having the feature for question 'openers' only? Where should I send this? – Mussri Apr 3 '12 at 13:16
  • Steck Exchange will likely go for solutions that are useful to the greatest number of people without complicating the site, so your solution would have to be those. As to where, after thoroughly reading the existing thread (linked to in this answer), then post a new one that explicitly states how it's not the same. (If your suggestion is too similar to the old one, it'll get closed as a duplicate. Sometimes even if it's not that similar.) Don't lose heart if the suggestion is declined; getting SE to implement a new feature is very difficult. Good luck! – Neil Fein Apr 3 '12 at 14:23

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